I was told by the interpreter that the kurdish say the mountains are their friends when they have no other friends.

Working in Northern Iraq Autonomous rΓ©gion of Kurdistan was revelatory, because it meant thinking through things or rather through non human beings, in order to help the local psychotherapists there learn new approches to the healing process of Kurdish and Yezidi people –as poet Birago Diop once encouraged us :

Breaths
Listen more often to things rather than beings. Hear the fire’s voice,
Hear the voice of water.
In the wind hear the sobbing of the trees,
It is our forefathers breathing.
The dead are not gone forever.
They are in the paling shadows,
And in the darkening shadows.
The dead are not beneath the ground, They are in the rustling tree,
In the murmuring wood,
In the flowing water,
In the still water,
In the lonely place, in the crowd: The dead are not dead.
Listen more often to things rather than beings. Hear the fire’s voice,
Hear the voice of water.
In the wind hear the sobbing of the trees.
It is the breathing of our forefathers,
Who are not gone, not beneath the ground, Not dead.
The dead are not gone for ever.
They are in a woman’s breast,
A child’s crying, a glowing ember.
The dead are not beneath the earth, They are in the flickering fire,
In the weeping plant, the groaning rock, The wooded place, the home.
The dead are not dead.
Listen more often to things rather than beings. Hear the fire’s voice,
Hear the voice of water.
In the wind hear the sobbing of the trees.
It is the breath of our forefathers.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s